Ha'penny Bridge in Dublin

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The Ha'penny Bridge (, or Droichead na Life), known later for a time as the Penny Ha'penny Bridge, and officially the Liffey Bridge, is a pedestrian bridge built in 1816 over the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. Made of cast-iron, the bridge was cast at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire.

Name

Originally called the Wellington Bridge (after the Duke of Wellington), the name of the bridge changed to Liffey Bridge. The Liffey Bridge

The toll was increased for a time to a Penny Ha'penny (one and a half pence), but was eventually dropped in 1919. While the toll was in operation, there were turnstiles at either end the bridge.

Renovation

In 2001 the number of pedestrians using the bridge on a daily basis was 27,000 and, given these traffic levels, a structural survey indicated that renovation was required.<ref name="PhillipsHamilton"/> The bridge was closed for repair and renovations during 2001 and was reopened in December 2001 sporting its original white colour.<ref name="IA"/>

The structure was rebuilt to retain many of its old components, although controversially some features were removed. The repair work was carried out by Harland and Wolff.




Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ha'penny_Bridge